British Journal of Educational Psychology

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Volume 27 Issue 1 (February 1957), Pages 1-75

DIFFERENCES BETWEEN SCHOOLS FOR THE MALADJUSTED AND ORDINARY BOARDING SCHOOLS (pages 29-36)

Summary.

  • 1.—
    A comparative study is presented of some of the physical, administrative and educational conditions prevailing in residential schools for the maladjusted and ordinary boarding schools.
  • 2.—
    General features, such as size, staffing, the children's age and length of stay are compared and contrasted. The incidence of educational retardation among maladjusted children was found to be much more extensive and the degree of it more serious.
  • 3.—
    While the incidence of problem behaviour was, of course, much greater in schools for the maladjusted, all the symptoms listed were also found among the pupils in ordinary boarding schools.
  • 4.—
    All schools for the maladjusted considered child‐adult relationships to be of great importance, as well as the maintenance of close liason with the children's homes. More liberal staffing conditions seem essential if these two conditions are to be met satisfactorily.

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