Journal of Organizational Behavior

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Volume 8 Issue 1 (January 1987), Pages fmi-fmi, 1-93

Differences in the importance of work outcomes between full‐time and part‐time hospital employees (pages 25-35)

Abstract

This study examined differences in the importance of work outcomes between full‐time and part‐time hospital employees in a sample drawn from five western hospitals (N = 1,876). Work status was operationalized by classifying respondents into four categories based on hours worked per week. Exploratory factor analysis showed that work outcomes may be classified as extrinsic (pay and fringe benefits) and instrinsic (being informed about the job, participating in decision‐making, and doing the job well). Confirmatory factor analyses demonstrated that this two‐factor structure fits the data well for all four work status categories although the factor loadings differed across categories. Multivariate analyses of variance and covariance indicated that statistically significant differences in the importance of extrinsic and intrinsic outcomes exist for full‐time and part‐time employees and that these differences persist when various social and demographic variables are held constant. Employees who work fewer hours per week tend to assign less importance to the work outcomes measured in this study. The results suggest that theoretical models of variables such as job satisfaction should take into account work status differences in the importance of work‐related outcomes. In addition, managers may find that workers respond to different reward structures depending on the degree of their involvement in the organization.

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