Journal of Occupational and Organizational Psychology

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Volume 74 Issue 1 (March 2001), Pages 1-124

Testing reciprocal relationships between job characteristics and psychological well‐being: A cross‐lagged structural equation model (pages 29-46)

This article describes a two‐wave panel study which was carried out to examine reciprocal relationships between job characteristics and work‐related psychological well‐being. Hypotheses were tested in a sample of 261 health care professionals using structural equation modelling (LISREL 8). Controlling for gender, age, and negative affectivity, the results primarily supported the hypothesis that Time 1 job characteristics influence Time 2 psychological well‐being. More specifically, Time 2 job satisfaction was determined by Time 1 job demands and workplace social support, respectively. Furthermore, there was also some preliminary but weak evidence for reversed cross‐lagged effects since Time 1 emotional exhaustion seemed to be the causal dominant factor with respect to Time 2 (perceived) job demands. In conclusion, this study builds on earlier cross‐sectional and longitudinal findings by eliminating confounding factors and diminishing methodological deficiencies. Empirical support for the influence of job characteristics on psychological well‐being affirms what several theoretical models have postulated to be the causal ordering among job characteristics and work‐related psychological well‐being.

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