Journal of Behavioral Decision Making

Skip to Search

Skip to Navigation

Volume 32 Issue 3 (July 2019), Pages 229-372

Less willing to pay but more willing to buy: How the elicitation method impacts the valuation of a promotion (pages 334-345)

Abstract Willingness to pay (WTP—how much one is willing to pay for something) and willingness to buy (WTB—whether one is willing to buy something at a given price) are two common methods to elicit valuations and normatively should yield the same valuation order between two options. However, this research finds that WTP and WTB can yield opposite valuation orders between the regular offer and the promotional offer of a product. Specifically, it demonstrate that, (a) if the valuation of a product is only elicited with WTP, consumers value the product less when it is offered with a price promotion than when it is not; (b) if the valuation of a product is only elicited with WTB, consumers value the product more when it is offered with a price promotion than when it is not; and (c) if the valuation of a product is first elicited with WTP and then elicited with WTB, consumers always value the product less when it is offered with a price promotion than when it is not. A value‐inference account is proposed for the above findings, according to which, consumers infer the value of a promoted product differently when the valuation is elicited only with WTP or only with WTB. Theoretically, this research extends prior literature on sales promotion, showing that the valuation of a promotion is subject to the elicitation method. Practically, this research suggests how to help consumers manage their purchase intentions for promoted products.

Add This link

Bookmark and Share>