Virtual Issue for the BPS Social Psychology Section Annual Conference 2014

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Edited By: Karen Douglas and Nick Hopkins

Welcome to this virtual issue of the British Journal of Social Psychology, which has been put together to coincide with the annual conference of the British Psychological Society’s Social Psychology Section Canterbury (9th - 11th September 2014). The conference theme is ‘The personal and the political in social psychology’ and this virtual issue showcases some of the work published in BJSP that has a particular resonance with such concerns. The papers available here have either been
published recently in the journal, or will be published in forthcoming issues. Continue reading the introduction here

thumbnail image: Virtual Issue for the BPS Social Psychology Section Annual Conference 2014

Published: 14 Aug 2014

Making good theory practical: Five lessons for an Applied Social Identity Approach to challenges of organizational, health, and clinical psychology Journal Article

Edited by: S. Alexander Haslam

  • DOI: 10.1111/bjso.12061
  • Published Date: March 14, 2014

Social identity research was pioneered as a distinctive theoretical approach to the analysis of intergroup relations but over the last two decades it has increasingly been used to shed light on applied issues. One early application of insights from social identity and self‐categorization theories was to the organizational domain (with a particular focus on leadership), but more recently there has been a surge of interest in applications...

Published in: British Journal of Social Psychology - Volume 53 Issue 1 (March 2014)

Embodying imagined contact: Facial feedback moderates the intergroup consequences of mental simulation Journal Article

Edited by: Michal Bilewicz, Aleksandra Kogan

  • DOI: 10.1111/bjso.12057
  • Published Date: December 9, 2013

Imagined contact is a fruitful strategy of improving intergroup attitudes. There are several mechanisms responsible for the effectiveness of such contact. This article presents a test of an affective mechanism of imagined contact by applying a facial feedback procedure. We used a physical blockade of the zygomaticus major muscle, known to constrain people's experience of emotional states. Participants imagining intergroup contact...

Published in: British Journal of Social Psychology - Volume 53 Issue 2 (June 2014)

‘Nice girls don't carry knives': Constructions of ambition in media coverage of Australia's first female prime minister Journal Article

Edited by: Lauren J. Hall, Ngaire Donaghue

  • DOI: 10.1111/j.2044-8309.2012.02114.x
  • Published Date: August 21, 2012

Julia Gillard became the first female prime minister of Australia in 2010. This paper examines the various ways in which her success was constructed in the Australian print media in the days immediately following her elevation. In particular, we focus on how an issue that has long beset women aspiring to power and leadership – the so‐called ‘double bind’ in which aspiring women leaders must display high competence and ambition in...

Published in: British Journal of Social Psychology - Volume 52 Issue 4 (December 2013)

Claiming and displaying national identity: Irish Travellers’ and students’ strategic use of ‘banal’ and ‘hot’ national identity in talk Journal Article

Edited by: Carmel Joyce, Clifford Stevenson, Orla Muldoon

  • DOI: 10.1111/j.2044-8309.2012.02097.x
  • Published Date: April 16, 2012

Two complementary explanations have been offered by social psychologists to account for the universal hold of national identity, first that national identity is ideologically assumed, as it forms the ‘banal’ background of everyday life, and second that national identity is ‘hotly’ constructed and contested in political and everyday settings to great effect. However, ‘banal’ and ‘hot’ aspects of national identity have been found to be...

Published in: British Journal of Social Psychology - Volume 52 Issue 3 (September 2013)

Justifying discrimination against Muslim immigrants: Out‐group ideology and the five‐step social identity model Journal Article

Edited by: Maykel Verkuyten

  • DOI: 10.1111/j.2044-8309.2011.02081.x
  • Published Date: November 10, 2011

This study examines how Geert Wilders, leader of the far‐right Party For Freedom (PVV) in the Netherlands, justifies discriminatory measures for Muslim citizens. Wilders’ contributions to four parliamentary debates and newspaper articles are analysed. The analysis shows that Wilders consistently makes a distinction between Islam as a belief system and Muslims as a group of people. Islam is defined as external to the West and as a major...

Published in: British Journal of Social Psychology - Volume 52 Issue 2 (June 2013)

‘Not our war, not our country’: Contents and contexts of Scottish political rhetoric and popular understandings during the invasion of Iraq Journal Article

Edited by: Guy Elcheroth, Steve Reicher

  • DOI: 10.1111/bjso.12020
  • Published Date: January 7, 2013

Recent research has questioned the traditional assumption that populations inevitably rally round their national leaders in times of war and suggested instead that whether this occurs depends upon political communication and mass media coverage. In this study, we provide systematic analysis of the debate in Scotland over the invasion of Iraq in 2003. We examine how the conflict was construed as either for or against the national interest,...

Published in: British Journal of Social Psychology - Volume 53 Issue 1 (March 2014)

Why did Italians protest against Berlusconi's sexist behaviour? The role of sexist beliefs and emotional reactions in explaining women and men's pathways to protest Journal Article

Edited by: Maria‐Paola Paladino, Sara Zaniboni, Fabio Fasoli, Jeroen Vaes, Chiara Volpato

  • DOI: 10.1111/bjso.12023
  • Published Date: January 18, 2013

By taking advantage of the Italian protest in 2009 in reaction to the behaviour of then Prime Minister Berlusconi, in this research, we investigated the role of sexist beliefs (i.e., hostile sexism, complementary gender differentiation, protective paternalism, and heterosexual intimacy) and group‐based emotional reactions (i.e., anger, humiliation, and sadness) to women's and men's action mobilization against public forms of sexism. The...

Published in: British Journal of Social Psychology - Volume 53 Issue 2 (June 2014)

Through the looking glass: Focusing on long‐term goals increases immanent justice reasoning Journal Article

Edited by: Mitchell J. Callan, Annelie J. Harvey, Rael J. Dawtry, Robbie M. Sutton

  • DOI: 10.1111/bjso.12022
  • Published Date: January 11, 2013

Immanent justice reasoning involves causally attributing a negative event to someone's prior moral failings, even when such a causal connection is physically implausible. This study examined the degree to which immanent justice represents a form of motivated reasoning in the service of satisfying the need to believe in a just world. Drawing on a manipulation that has been shown to activate justice motivation, participants causally...

Published in: British Journal of Social Psychology - Volume 52 Issue 2 (June 2013)

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